Tuesday, 23 December 2008

Wednesday, 17 December 2008

Sunday, 16 November 2008

Saturday, 15 November 2008

Sunday, 26 October 2008

Tuesday, 21 October 2008

Saturday, 4 October 2008

GOLDEN PEEKS AT RHODESIAN

When my little golden retriever, Meadow, was just a pup, I took her to the dog part where she played the day away with a gorgeous rhodesian ridgeback. Later that year, I let her pick a rhodesian puppy out of a litter and that is how we came to have my beautiful boy Kane. I love this shot.

Sunday, 28 September 2008

Tuesday, 9 September 2008

DINOSAURS VS. CROCODILIAN UPSTARTS -- A BATTLE FOR SURVIVAL


Dinosaurs, long hailed as the rulers of the Triassic almost lost the title belt to a group of crocodilian upstarts, the crurotarsans. In a short lived battle for survival, geologically speaking, the two groups ran head to head for about thirty million years. The Crurotarsi or "cross-ankles" as they are affectionately known, are a group of archosaurs - formerly known as Pseudosuchians when paleontologist Paul Serono renamed them for their node-based clade in 1991

Friday, 11 July 2008

Friday, 4 July 2008

Tuesday, 24 June 2008

2008-10-12 - British Columbia, Canada: danneggiato sito dell’Eocene (fossil site damaged) Fossil hunters run amok and the B.C. government sits idle S



Reprinted from the Vancouver Sun, Published: Friday, October 10, 2008

While my writing is referenced, I did was not contacted for the article and did not provide comment.

A fossil bed of global importance is being irreparably damaged by commercial fossil hunters operating with provincial government approval, say leading scientists.

And scientists’ letters to a series of cabinet ministers and senior bureaucrats show that although the province is finally seeking someone to monitor the site, it has been aware of the concerns for almost a decade.

The operations take place under provincial regulations.

One letter likened what’s been going on to “wrapping fish in the Dead Sea Scrolls.”

The McAbee site between Kamloops and Cache Creek is a 51-million-year-old lake bed that yields exquisitely preserved fossils from the early Eocene epoch. Scientists say it holds answers critical to our present-day understanding of how plants and animals adapt to rapid climate change.

The Eocene is known for its diversity of large and exotic mammals, among them a carnivorous ungulate. The scientific value of the McAbee site, however, is its vast array of lesser-known plant, insect, fish and bird species that flourished when the world was much warmer and palms grew in what’s now Alaska.

Tree leaves, flowers and pollen fell into the water, sank into the mud along with now-extinct insect and fish species and, layer by layer over millions of years, created a stunning fossilized record of a lost world that may hold information crucial to survival in ours.

It’s the diversity of the site that permits scientists to collect large assemblages of fossil specimens preserved in vertical layers of shale — the site’s “stratigraphy” — and enables them to study their evolution over long periods of time.

The Eocene is vital for scientific study because it was in this time that the evolutionary ancestors of many modern animals, insects and plants first appeared.

But five of Canada’s leading paleontologists have written to the provincial government protesting that the stratigraphic integrity of the site is being destroyed by the use of heavy equipment in the hunt for individual specimens prized for commercial sale.

“We are writing to you to express our concern that an important British Columbia heritage site is currently being dismantled and sold to the highest bidder,” the scientists said in a March 2, 2007 letter to Charlie Wyse, the Liberal MLA for Cariboo South.

“This important fossil locality is currently under mineral claim by fossil dealers, has been extensively worked, and is being rapidly destroyed.”

The letter, one of a number going back as far as 2002, advised the province that individual fossil specimens from the McAbee site were for sale on the Internet.

The letter was signed by James Haggart, chair of the B.C. Paleontological Alliance, Rolf Mathewes of Simon Fraser University, James Basinger at the University of Saskatchewan, David Greenwood at Brandon University and Bruce Archibald, a PhD candidate at Harvard University.

Archibald, now a post-doctoral fellow at Simon Fraser University, has done extensive research on the McAbee fossils.

He wrote again on Sept. 11, 2008, this time to Stan Hagen, minister of agriculture and lands, to inform the government that he had just visited the McAbee site.

“I was absolutely shocked to see the amount of new destruction present,” Archibald wrote. “In fact, the richest beds containing the most finely preserved and most diverse fossils are now completely destroyed, or very nearly so. It is quite clear that degradation of the site has greatly accelerated since I visited it last year before the claimholders signed the current agreement with your ministry supposedly defining their appropriate stewardship of the site.”

shume@islandnet.com

© The Vancouver Sun 2008

————————————————————————————-

Additional info:

Site description: http://www.fossilmuseum.net/Fossil_Sites/mcabee.htm

Scientific info: by Heidi Henderson blog

Fossil tour: http://www.dll-fossils.com/

Fossils for sale: http://www.fossilscapes.com/plants/plantfossils1.htm

Ottobre 12, 2008 - Pubblicato da Giuseppe Buono | A - Paleontologia, G - America Northern, P - Geositi, P - Paleobotanica, T - Eocene, Z - Commercio illegale | fossili, Canada, Eocene, fossils, fossilien, British Columbia, danneggiato, fossil site, damaged | Nessun Commento

Non c’รจ ancora nessun commento.

Thursday, 12 June 2008

Monday, 2 June 2008

CANADIAN ROCKIES: TYAUGHTON

SALMON: RETURN TO SENDER

We are all familiar with the image of salmon returning to fresh water, to the rivers of their youth, to spawn and complete their lifecycle, in fact, it is one of the staple images of British Columbia. As adults, we bring our children to witness this cycle, rushing to the banks of our local rivers to watch as the adults, keen in their fight for reproduction and survival, struggle to complete their epic journeys against currents and predators. Arriving as they do, year upon year, season upon season, it seems to us that this is how it has been since time immemorial.

But we now have evidence that migration to the sea may be a relatively recent behaviour. Fossil beds at Driftwood Canyon, near Smithers, contain large numbers of fossil salmonid remains from the Eocene age, approximately 45 million years ago. What is interesting is that the fossil beds are filled equally with both juvenile and larger adults.

If these salmon were heading off to sea in their juvenile form and returning to spawn as adults we would expect to find an abundance of larger carcasses in the lake sediments and relatively few juveniles. Given the equal numbers, we can conclude that the salmonids of the Eocene, lived out their lifecycle as a landlocked species, the way Kokanee do today.

Thursday, 15 May 2008

PERFECT MORNING

PLAYING IN THE WAKE

NORTHERN BC

:: Dragon in the Rocks :: The Early Years of Mary Anning ::



Dragon in the Rocks. A Story Based on the Childhood of Early Paleontologist Mary Anning

Toronto: Owl/Greey de Pencier, 1992. [32] p.ISBN 0-920775-76-4

Mary Anning (1799-1847)/biography – Paleontology/England/19th century


Looking to inspire a young mind to the wonders of our world? Consider a new picture book for young readers from Owl Press. This lovely new book shares the early years of Mary Anning - a simple tale of curiosity and determination within the wider context of an historical geological discovery.

Twelve-year-old Mary Anning had always enjoyed collecting fossils with her father, an amateur collector, who before he died, taught her the techniques of chipping and separating fossils from rocks.

Mary's father also told her of a dragon skeleton he had once seen in a cave near their home in Lyme Regis on the southern coast of England. One day the opportunity arose to visit the cave herself, and subsequently she spent many months chipping, numbering and packing up the fossil pieces of the 26-foot-long ichthyosaur skeleton, which has now been on display at the Natural History Museum in London for nearly 200 years.

Although the story ends with the visit of important scientists to her home to see her rebuilt skeleton, children may well be inspired to learn more about the interests and life of this unsung heroine and about paleontology.

Looking for more inspiration on the significant finds of other young paleontologists... look to Tumbler Ridge and the discovery by Daniel Helm of a significant dinosaur trackway that inspired a community or to Vancouver Island and the tale of paleontology in beautiful Courtenay where the Trask family found one of BC's most famous marine reptiles.

Visit http://www.bcfossils.ca/ and learn more!

Sea Dragons of the Cretaceous

:: Free Fossil Lecture & Display this Victoria Day Long Weekend:

The Vancouver Paleontological Society hosts a talk this Saturday, May 2nd, 2PM, at the Vancouver Museum/Planetarium.

  • The feature speaker will be Timon Bullard on Sea Dragons of Cretaceous Seas. Come hear about the large marine reptiles who swam our waters millions of years ago!Vancouver Museum/Planetarium, 1100 Chestnut Street (off Cornwall in Kitsilano).

  • All talks are free and open to the public. Fossils will also be on display. Visit http://www.bcfossils.ca/ to learn about all the paleontological activities in BC.

Come on down and bring a friend!

Tuesday, 13 May 2008

:: ARMORED BEAST :: DESMATOSUCHUS ::

A detailed description of Desmatosuchus


:: Description of new material of the aetosaur Desmatosuchus spurensis (Archosauria: Suchia) from the Chinle Formation of Arizona and a revision of the genus DesmatosuchusWilliam Parker, PaleoBios 28(1):1–40, May 12, 2008Abstract: A new specimen of Desmatosuchus from northeastern Arizona (MNA V9300) preserves almost the entire vertebral column, the pelvis, and the majority of the armor carapace, allowing for an unprecedented detailed description of the taxon.



Articulation and reconstruction of the armor carapace demonstrates that previous reconstructions of Desmatosuchus are erroneous in the orientation and position of the lateral armor. Lateral plates of the anterior dorsal region possess low rounded knobs instead of developed spines.



The dorsal flange of the lateral plates of the dorsal region is longer than the lateral or ventral flange making the carapace transversely wider than previously thought. As a result, previous reconstructions articulate the lateral armor not only backwards but also on the wrong sides of the body. Posterior presacral vertebrae are extremely robust and possess fused ribs and the last presacral vertebra has been fused to the sacrum, a character that may be taxonomically useful.



A prefrontal bone is also present in Desmatosuchus, contrary to previous descriptions. Reinvestigation of the genus Desmatosuchus suggests that there are only two valid species, D. spurensis and D. smalli. The lectotype of Episcoposaurus haplocerus is referable to Desmatosuchus but indeterminate at the species level, and therefore represents a nomen dubium.



Accordingly, D. spurensis is reinstated as the type species of Desmatosuchus and the new Arizona specimen is assigned to this taxon. Acaenasuchus geoffreyi, a purported juvenile form of Desmatosuchus, is not referable to Desmatosuchus.

Sunday, 27 April 2008

A Wee Beasty for Betsy


I was delighted to hear that one of our long lost friends and renowned paleontologist, Betsy Nicholls would be honored with a new namesake out of Alberta - a mighty marine hunter from our Cretaceous Seas... This newly described plesiosaur, Nichollsia borealis, has been named for the late Elizabeth (Betsy) Nicholls, a renowned paleontologist from the University of Calgary. Betsy holds a special place in the hearts of the paleo community, particularly those in Alberta and British Columbia who had the opportunity to work with her over the years.

She greatly broadened our understanding of the large marine reptiles who swam our ancient seas in describing one of the largest marine reptiles ever to be found. Alberta is the home of the dinosaurs, but it was Betsy’s work that opened up our eyes to the great marine beasties that continue to be unearthed over much of northern British Columbia…

Monday, 21 April 2008

Friday, 21 March 2008

Flattering the Huntress...

Blog Spotlight: Unearthing the Fossil Huntress Blog

March 21st, 2008 by Alvin Ramirez

I discovered Heidi Henderson’s work in Scientific Blogging. Henderson, an author and Chair of the Vancouver Paleontological Society, has dubbed herself the Fossil Huntress. Blogger is where you’ll find her Archea: Musings in Natural History blog. In her Profile page, she lists “Explorer” under Occupation, a dream profession of every precocious child.

The appeal of the Fossil Huntress is to nature lovers and those who fascinate in rocks and the timeless stories they tell of the earth and its creatures. Her personal and intimate writing style has a Rachel Carson feel to it. Engaging in her descriptions, she has a talent for taking the reader by the hand on her journeys hunting for fossils and sharing with them the thrill of discovery and adventure.

The titles she chooses for her posts are enough to tickle naturalists and fellow fossil hunters to click, read on, and keep coming back for more. Her words simply move you to excitement. The following are just a few of the catchy article and blog titles she uses that speak of experiences that could only come from an adventurer like her.

Grizzly Encounter on the Brown Lakes
Haida Gwaii: Queen Charlotte Islands out of the Mist
The Pleasures and Pain of Siltstone: Fossils from the Callovian Mysterious Creek Formation

Reading Henderson takes me back to old times as a boy when I would excitedly follow clues to fossils and collect them from places that held treasures right beneath my feet. As Henderson aptly puts it in one of her posts, “You’ll feel a rush of excitement as you scramble up the talus slop to the 300-metre shale outcropping and begin to find magnificently preserved plants, insects, flowers and feathers in the loose shale.”

Posted in Blog Spotlight

Tuesday, 4 March 2008

FLATTERING THE HUNTRESS...


Blog Spotlight: Unearthing the Fossil Huntress Blog :: March 21st, 2008 by Alvin Ramirez ... I discovered Heidi Henderson’s work in Scientific Blogging. Henderson, an author and Chair of the Vancouver Paleontological Society, has dubbed herself the Fossil Huntress. Blogger is where you’ll find her Archea: Musings in Natural History blog. In her Profile page, she lists “Explorer” under Occupation, a dream profession of every precocious child. The appeal of the Fossil Huntress is to nature lovers and those who fascinate in rocks and the timeless stories they tell of the earth and its creatures. Her personal and intimate writing style has a Rachel Carson feel to it. Engaging in her descriptions, she has a talent for taking the reader by the hand on her journeys hunting for fossils and sharing with them the thrill of discovery and adventure.

The titles she chooses for her posts are enough to tickle naturalists and fellow fossil hunters to click, read on, and keep coming back for more. Her words simply move you to excitement. The following are just a few of the catchy article and blog titles she uses that speak of experiences that could only come from an adventurer like her.
Reading Henderson takes me back to old times as a boy when I would excitedly follow clues to fossils and collect them from places that held treasures right beneath my feet. As Henderson aptly puts it in one of her posts, “You’ll feel a rush of excitement as you scramble up the talus slop to the 300-metre shale outcropping and begin to find magnificently preserved plants, insects, flowers and feathers in the loose shale.”

Originally posted in Blog Spotlight

MASTODON

Monday, 3 March 2008

Tuesday, 19 February 2008

Sunshine & Rain: Bowron's Lanezi and Sandy Lakes


Like most mountainous areas, Bowron makes its own weather system and it appears you get everything in a 24-hour period. In fact, whatever weather you are enjoying seems to change 40 minutes later; good for rain, bad for sun. Wisps of cloud that seemed light and airy only hours early have become dark.

Careful to hug the shore in our kayaks, we are ready for a quick escape from lightening as thundershowers break. Paddling in the rain, I notice bits of mica in the water, playing in the light and the rock change here to greywacke, argillite, phyllite and schist. Past Lanezi, we continue onto Sandy Lake, where old growth cedars line the south-facing slopes to our left and grey limestone, shale and dolostone line the shore. Mottled in with the rock, we sneak up on very convincing stumps posing as large mammals.

Picking up the Cariboo River again, we follow it as it flows into Babcock Lake, an area edged with Lower Cambrian limestone, shale and argillite. At the time these rocks were laid down, the Earth was seeing our earliest relatives, the first chordates entering the geologic scene.

Saturday, 16 February 2008

Wednesday, 13 February 2008

THE SCIENCE OF LOVE AND INFIDELITY

Big chin. Big cheater.

As Valentine’s Day approaches, both mating and chocolate get on the brain. If you have not already chosen your new love, researchers suggest you stay away from those with big chins as they have a tendency to cheat. Researchers from four universities across the US and Canada prodded into the sexual habits of chinny and relatively chin-less females to determine these resultts.

Kidding? No, they’ve published in the journal Personality And Individual Differences, so it must be true. Larger chins, especially on adult females, are associated with the male growth hormone testosterone and too much of that bad boy can lead to messing around. It seems on an unconscientious level men sense this trend and are biased against a more masculine chin.

"The findings are important in demonstrating that perceptions of women as desirable and trustworthy long-term mates can be reliably gleaned by men from viewing only the women's facial features.

"Results suggest that information about women's sexual unrestrictedness, which is related to their risk of infidelity, can potentially be conveyed by the masculinity of women's faces."

Hogwash you say? Perhaps you are already hooked up with said chin-cheater? Well, they may cheat, but you may also have found s sexual goldmine. Women with larger chins are also more sexually assertive and perhaps better in bed.

While the study only looked at the chins of the female of our species. Friends and neighbors also speculate on the tendencies of our males. Is Leno a complete dog? And what of the chin of our own Brian Mulroney?

Bring on the chocolate and the chins I say. It's Valentine's Day!

View the original story at http://fossilhuntress.blogspot.com/

Sunday, 10 February 2008

Friday, 1 February 2008

Possible Walrus Bone Found near Grand Manan


New find near Grand Manan, New Bruinswick needs ID... a few people have taken a look and the most likely critter seems to be a walrus.
If you have any thoughts, please pass them along : )

Thursday, 24 January 2008

Sunday, 20 January 2008

MYSTERIOUS DESIGN : ACROSS THE UNIVERSE


The Fossil Huntress was intrigued by astrophysicist George Smoot's stunning new images from deep-space surveys. His ideas prod us to ponder how the cosmos -- with its giant webs of dark matter and mysterious gaping voids -- got built this way.

read more | digg story

Saturday, 19 January 2008

Thursday, 3 January 2008

Burgess Shale 2008


BURGESS
SHALE
2008
For those of you who are interested in seeing the magnificent fossils of the Burgess Shale or hiking to the Mt. Stephen Fossil Beds, here is the updated information for 2008:
Reservations are taken at 9AM to Noon and 1PM to 3PM local time on Mondays to Fridays. General Information for registering for the Guided Hikes to the:

Burgess Shale – Walcott Quarry
Mt. Stephen Fossil Beds and the
Climate Change Hike

Payment must be made at the time of registering for each hike. There is a no refund policy and the fee for making changes to the schedule of the hike once the registration has been made is $20 CAD per person. There is no answering machine on the 1-800-343-3006, if you wish to leave a message please phone the administration number at: 250-343-6006. Office hours during weekdays only.

The residential mailing addresses with postal/zip code is required for each person in your group. At the time of registering the name and address of the person registering is required and the additional names and addresses can be emailed to: info@burgess-shale.bc.ca at a later date, but prior to the date of the hike. The method of payment is master card, visa or personal cheques approved by the Director. Cheques must be received within one week from the date of registration or the registration will be cancelled. You can fax your credit card information to: 250-343-6426 no cover page is required.

The payment for the hike will be processed and you and a confirmation and waiver form will be emailed to you. The confirmation form provides you with the details of the hike, the meeting places and times and what you need to bring with you during the hike. The waiver form must be filled in, signed in the appropriate places and witnessed by a friend or neighbour. Bring the completed waiver form with you and hand it to your guide on the morning of the hike. Do not mail the waiver form. A legal guardian must sign for children under the age of 19 years.

Please provide us with the place you are staying and a contact phone number of where you can be reached on the night prior to the hike. This is necessary in the event that bad weather results in delays or cancellation of the hike or we need to change the meeting place. Sorry, cell phones do not work in here in Field. If the Foundation cancels the hike for whatever reason, you will be provided with a full refund.
For information regarding group bookings please call Randle Robertson at 1-800-343-3006.

If you require additional information please refer to our website: http://www.burgess-shale.bc.ca/