Monday, 6 July 2020

SEAWEED: MACROALGAE

Seaweed, or macroalgae, refers to several species of macroscopic, multicellular, marine algae sometimes called sea vegetables. They are forms of algae that grow in every ocean on Earth. They're a food source for ocean life and humans and range in colour from red to green to brown to black. 

Seaweed grows along rocky shorelines around the world, but it's most commonly eaten in Asian countries such as Japan, Korea and China, though countries like Ireland are starting to get on the seaweed bandwagon.

The term includes some types of Rhodophyta (red), Phaeophyta (brown) and Chlorophyta (green) macroalgae. Seaweed species such as kelps provide essential nursery habitat for fisheries and other marine species and thus protect food sources; other species, such as planktonic algae, play a vital role in capturing carbon, producing up to 90% of Earth's oxygen. 

Understanding these roles offers principles for conservation and sustainable use. Mechanical dredging of kelp, for instance, destroys the resource and dependent fisheries.